WS-REST 2010 CfP

January 14th, 2010  |  Published in call for papers, conferences, REST  |  Bookmark on

I’m on the program committee for the WS-REST 2010 conference. Please consider submitting a paper, but note that the submission deadline is coming up quickly.

WS-REST 2010
Paper Submission: February 8, 2010

Call for Papers

The First International Workshop on RESTful Design (WS-REST 2010) aims to provide a forum for discussion and dissemination of research on the emerging resource-oriented style of Web service design.


Over the past few years, several discussions between advocates of the two major architectural styles for designing and implementing Web services (the RPC/ESB-oriented approach and the resource-oriented approach) have been mainly held outside of the research and academic community, within dedicated mailing lists, forums and practitioner communities. The RESTful approach to Web services has also received a significant amount of attention from industry as indicated by the numerous technical books being published on the topic.

This first edition of WS-REST, co-located with the WWW2010 conference, aims at providing an academic forum for discussing current emerging research topics centered around the application of REST, as well as advanced application scenarios for building large scale distributed systems.

In addition to presentations on novel applications of RESTful Web services technologies, the workshop program will also include discussions on the limits of the applicability of the REST architectural style, as well as recent advances in research that aim at tackling new problems that may require to extend the basic REST architectural style. The organizers are seeking novel and original, high quality paper submissions on research contributions focusing on the following topics:

  • Applications of the REST architectural style to novel domains
  • Design Patterns and Anti-Patterns for RESTful services
  • RESTful service composition
  • Inverted REST (REST for push events)
  • Integration of Pub/Sub with REST
  • Performance and QoS Evaluations of RESTful services
  • REST compliant transaction models
  • Mashups
  • Frameworks and toolkits for RESTful service implementations
  • Frameworks and toolkits for RESTful service consumption
  • Modeling RESTful services
  • Resource Design and Granularity
  • Evolution of RESTful services
  • Versioning and Extension of REST APIs
  • HTTP extensions and replacements
  • REST compliant protocols beyond HTTP
  • Multi-Protocol REST (REST architectures across protocols)

All workshop papers are peer-reviewed and accepted papers will be published as part of the ACM Digital Library. Two kinds of contributions are sought: short position papers (not to exceed 4 pages in ACM style format) describing particular challenges or experiences relevant to the scope of the workshop, and full research papers (not to exceed 8 pages in the ACM style format) describing novel solutions to relevant problems. Technology demonstrations are particularly welcome, and we encourage authors to focus on “lessons learned” rather than describing an implementation.

Papers must be submitted electronically in PDF format. Submit at the WS-REST 2010 EasyChair installation.

Important Dates

  • Submission deadline: February 8, 2010, 23.59 Hawaii time
  • Notification of acceptance: March 1, 2010
  • Camera-ready versions of accepted papers: March 14, 2010
  • WS-REST 2010 Workshop: April 26, 2010

Program Committee Chairs

Program Committee


WS-REST Web site:
WS-REST Email:

Upcoming Conferences

November 5th, 2009  |  Published in conferences  |  Bookmark on

On Friday December 4th I’ll be giving a keynote at the Middleware 2009 conference. It’s the 10th such conference and I’ve been involved as chair or program committee member for a few of them, and I’m very much looking forward to attending again.

February 9-11 I’ll be attending speakerconf, which I believe will be really cool. The attendee list is very compelling and I’m anticipating a few days of engaging conversations and presentations.

QCon London 2008 Presentation Video

April 9th, 2009  |  Published in conferences, distributed systems, HTTP, REST, reuse, web  |  Bookmark on

You may have already seen this on InfoQ or on Stefan’s blog, but the video of my 2008 QCon London presentation “REST, Reuse, and Serendipity” is now available.

Here it is, just a little over a year after I gave that presentation, and REST continues to deliver extremely well for my work. For example, I just finished a meeting a couple hours ago where some client code needs to interact with a particular part of my system via HTTP but wants XML instead of the JSON currently provided. Simple — it’s just a different representation of the same resources, and of course it wasn’t hard to guess months ago that such a need would eventually come down the pike, so fitting it into the system will be trivial. Can you imagine the hoops one would have to jump through with typical RPC-oriented systems for this case, where the marshaling format is typically tied to the protocol and you can’t change either one? You’d have to write a new service interface with new verbs and new messages and get the client side to use it, or write client-side wrappers around whatever you already have and ask the client programmers to somehow incorporate those wrappers into their code. Either way, there’s simply no chance of reusing existing agreements; instead, both sides require non-trivial specialization.

One problem I noticed, though, was that the client developers asked for a “REST-like interface” and also for a document listing all resource URIs, and for each one, the HTTP verbs that apply to it, the representations available from it, and what status codes to expect from invoking operations on it. Those two requests are sort of mutually exclusive, depending on what “REST-like” means; for a proper RESTful system, you don’t need a document like that, at least not the type of document they’re asking for.

QCon London: The Best One Yet

March 18th, 2009  |  Published in concurrency, conferences, erlang, functional, functional programming, RPC, standards  |  Bookmark on

QCon is always very, very good, but QCon London 2009 last week was the best one yet. Highlights:

  • Ola Bini‘s “Emerging Languages in the Enterprise” track on Wednesday had some great talks, especially Rich Hickey’s Clojure talk. Ola’s deep knowledge and love of programming languages made him the perfect host for this track, and he put together a brilliant lineup.
  • Speaking of Rich, I consider myself very lucky to have gotten to meet and spend a fair amount of time with him. He’s very bright, talented, knowledgeable, and experienced, and both of his talks were outstanding.
  • I introduced Rich to Joe Armstrong at the conference party Wednesday evening and they spent the next few hours talking at length about functional programming, their respective languages, VM implementation issues, concurrency issues, etc. Ola jumped in as well. They also continued the conversation the next day. I just sat back, listened, and learned.
  • Getting to spend time again with Joe was excellent. He always has incredibly useful analyses and opinions to express, and in general is fun to be around and easy to learn from.
  • I also finally got to meet Ulf Wiger, Erlang developer extraordinaire, in person. He’s a laid back guy, quite well-informed and a deep thinker who can cover a wide variety of topics in amazingly useful detail. His talk on multicore programming in Erlang covered cutting edge Erlang development and presented some very difficult concurrency issues.
  • Ulf’s talk, as well as Rich’s second talk, which was on persistent data structures and managed references, were part of Francesco Cesarini‘s “Functional and Concurrent Programming Languages Applied” track on Thursday. I met Francesco, who like Ulf is one of the world’s top Erlang developers, at QCon London last year. He assembled a great track for this conference, with Rich’s and Ulf’s back-to-back talks being way more than enough to sober up any developer who thinks that multicore is not an issue and that today’s methods for dealing with concurrency will continue to work just fine. Best of luck with that!
  • Sir Tony Hoare‘s talk about the null reference being his “billion dollar mistake” was great because of all the detail he recounted from some of the early days of computing. He was both informative and entertaining. I was also impressed with Ulf during this talk, whom Professor Sir Hoare invited to come up to the front and present what turned out to be a pretty convincing argument in favor of the null reference.
  • Paul Downey‘s talk on the downsides of standardization was by far the most humorous talk I heard, perfect to close out the track, but it also presented a number of hard-won useful lessons about the perils of standardization efforts.

As with all QCon conferences, there were a bunch of interesting tracks running in parallel, and unfortunately I still haven’t figured out how to be in multiple places at once. I had to miss Michael Nygard‘s talk, for example, because my own talk got moved to the same time slot as his.

My talk (PDF) covered the history of RPC, why it got to be the way it was, and why the forces that created it really aren’t all that viable anymore.

The final conference panel was by far the most inventive panel I’ve ever been on. Modeled after the British game show “It’s a Bullseye!” and hosted by none other than Jim Webber, it had contestants from the audience throwing darts to become eligible for a prize. Once a contestant became eligible, Jim would ask the panel — Michael Nygard, Ian Robinson, Martin Fowler, and me — to answer a question submitted by conference attendees either earlier during the conference or live via Twitter. Based on our answers, audience members held up either a green card if they liked the answers or a red one if they didn’t, and if the majority was green, the contestant would win a book. The questions were hard! We had only two minutes each to answer, which for some questions seemed like an eternity but for most was way too short. Anyway, it was great fun, and given how many there were in the audience after three grueling conference days and how much they seemed to be enjoying themselves, it worked very, very well.

If you have any interest at all in leading edge software and computing topics being presented by the world’s most knowledgeable speakers in a fun atmosphere, go to QCon. I guarantee you won’t be disappointed.

Another Great QCon

November 22nd, 2008  |  Published in conferences, REST  |  Bookmark on

Just getting ready to fly home from QCon San Francisco. Not surprisingly, it was another great conference, and the organizers told me that attendance was up about 30% over last year. Having a well organized and well executed conference with a large number of great speakers tends to have that effect.

Jim Webber put together and ran the REST track, and it was one of the best tracks I’ve ever been a part of. Mark Nottingham is extremely knowledgeable on the REST and HTTP fronts, so he gave a very informative talk on HTTP and the work of the HTTPbis group. Ian Robinson and Stu Charlton both spoke on using REST in the enterprise (it’s coming, like it or not). Leonard Richardson talked about how to judge the quality of RESTful services, but I missed most of his talk because I went out to stretch my legs and couldn’t get back in because the room was so packed! I spoke about my work with REST, Erlang, and Yaws. You can get all the slide sets for this track from the QCon site.

Got to meet a few people in person for the first time, such as Leonard, and also Tim Bray (who asked great questions during my talk, thanks Tim), and Michael Nygard, who is as bright and articulate in person as he is in his amazingly wonderful book (if you haven’t read it, do yourself a favor and put it on your holiday wish list). I also briefly met Dave Pollak who gave a great talk on Scala and Lift in Erik Meijer’s “Functional and Concurrent Programming Languages Applied” track. I found it interesting that in Lift he uses some of the same request dispatching techniques I use in my work with Yaws, even though he’s writing in Scala and I in Erlang. Functional languages rule.

Speaking of Erlang, Francesco Cesarini was there, also speaking in Erik’s track. He talked about Erlang concurrency and the continued development of Erlang’s SMP capabilities. Jan Lehnardt gave a couple of CouchDB talks, which seems to just keep garnering more and more interest, and rightfully so. Dennis Byrne gave a talk on Erlang and DSLs — I unfortunately missed it but knowing Dennis I’m sure it was thought-provoking and worthwhile.

It was also fun getting to see and hang out with Jay Fields and Glenn Vanderburg again. Both are extremely sharp.

Thanks again to the QCon organizers for another wonderful conference, and I’m already looking forward to QCon London next March.